MUNCHI'S REGGAETON TOP 12

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We’re continuing MUNCHI DAY on Generation Bass with his Top 12, yes not 10 but 12 Tracks.  Trust Munchi to be different and even defy and rebel against our limits lol!!

His reasons for giving me a Top 12 instead of a Top 10 were as follows:

“It was quite difficult to get a final 10 that I had to make a final 12 – and even that was hard haha. In the end I chose this because it is exclusively of this era though. Quite hard to leave out one of my absolute favorite Reggeton artists – Angel Doze. So I gotta mention if it was about Reggeton in general – Angel Doze would be in the top 3”

It’s a ReggaetonFest!

1. Nicky Jam – Gatas En La Disco Andan

2. Yaviah – Wiki Wiki

3. Nejo – Asi Es La Vida

4. Don Omar ft. Cheka – Amor De Colegio (Unreleased Demo)

5. Daddy Yankee ft Sir Speedy – Recuerdas

6. Peligro – Cheesecake

7. Baby Rasta Y Gringo – Quiero Mas Y Mas

8. Lito Y Polaco – Estamos En Guerra

9. Divino ft. DJ Blass – Sudar, Perrear

10. Zion Y Lennox – Me Pones En Tension

11. Hector Y Tito – Felina

12. Las Guanabanas – Mas Perreo

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xxblassxx : I Want Trvp Music In To Kuduro

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I’m an Audi man too and so xxblassxx has good taste.

Bangerooney of a track with a great flow and groove with 2 distinct genres combined effectively, Trap & Kuduro!

These Latino’s, like their brothers, The Africano’s, just DO IT BETTER!

AFROPOP WORLDWIDE

Great bunch of pr0grammes here, which provide an excellent insight into some of the Transnational Roots genres that we love here at Generation Bass!

Educational!

HAMMOCK HOUSE : AFRICA CARIBE

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Joaquin “Joe” Claussell is my kinda man, apart from being an absolute LEG -END, he mixed this new work LIVE and so he gets top marks, 1st class honours from me 🙂

He says:

“I wanted to do a futuristic mix, where stories are being created with soundscapes and tapestries, and segues work as introductions to each story. I wanted to create bridges through different rhythms…..I mixed it live with four CD players, effects, and reel-to-reel……… I wanted to mix it live so you get more of a human feel from it, to stay true to the texture of this music.”!

Here’s what the Press Release says;

HAMMOCK HOUSE – “AFRICA CARIBE” – PRODUCED & MIXED BY JOAQUIN “JOE” CLAUSSELL

(OUT MAY 17, 2011)

FANIA TAPS CLAUSSELL WITH RECORDING TAPES TO THEIR BACK CATALOG.

THE RESULT IS A STUNNING TWO-DISC ALBUM; THE FIRST IS A LIVE CONTINUES MIX, WHILE THE SECOND FEATURES FRESH RE-WORKINGS OF CLASSIC FANIA TRACKS

New York, NY – Fania Records announced today the release of a deluxe 2-disc set entitled, Hammock House ‘Africa Caribe’ produced and mixed by the legendary Joaquin “Joe” Claussell, with a worldwide release date of May 17, 2011. The project is a perfect marriage between old and new, a fresh take on classic sounds from the Fania archives. Late last year, Fania Records hand delivered the original multi-tracks (recording tapes) in a battered cardboard box to Joe Claussell’s NYC studio. Inside was a round metal reel wrapped with many feet of rolled magnetic tape, and a crumbling “Track Report” sheet from some matter-of-fact day in the 1970s. As Joe ecstatically explained, “When the carrier came to my place with all these boxes, I had an Indiana Jones moment, like when he opens the treasure chest and the glow of gold light shines up on his face. It was miraculous that they were still around, and the history of this stuff is just amazing.”

Michael Rucker, chief marketing officer of Codigo Group came up with the original idea of Hammock House and knew that Joe Claussell was the right person for the job. Joe grew up Puerto Rican in New York – or more precisely Nuyorican, with all the simmering, sweltering swirl of identity that comes to pass for a kid growing up with nine brothers and sisters in roiling, toiling Brooklyn. DJ/producer/label-head Joe Claussell is perhaps the most influential and in-demand figure on the New York dance scene since Masters At Work. Responsible for some of the best deep and soulful house NYC has heard, Claussell’s Sunday night Body & Soul DJ gig is one of the most legendary house parties of the ’90s. Former owner of the landmark record store Dance Tracks, and long associated with the house labels Spiritual Life and Ibadan, they all reflect his deep love for and his eclectic and multicultural taste in dance music. Much of the global dance movement can be traced back to Claussell’s highly percussive style that incorporates Latin, African, Brazilian and other world rhythms with elements of jazz, rock, disco, and live instrumentation.

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What you hear on Hammock House are more than mere remixes. Each track was approached and assembled differently, each on its own terms. As Joe says, “Some songs were edited, some were time-stretched…many parts were re-recorded…some new parts were recorded on top.” Furthermore Joe elaborates, “I would listen to these songs and think what am I going to do to that?! A lot of them sounded perfect as they were. But the mentality of the ‘60s and ‘70s, when it came to music, people were just creating as artists – from the soul, from the heart. They took a lot of the technical stuff for granted. They were making music, not thinking about different mixes or anybody touching their art in the future. So I tried to keep the integrity of what’s there. Fania is very sacred to the Puerto Rican and Cuban heritage, so it was important that it get taken in by the right hands.”

The first disc is a live continuous mix by Claussell, but not like your average DJ mixing one track into another Joe’s states his goal for the mix-CD was to create an epic journey that begins in the Motherland (Africa) to moves to New York. “I wanted to do a futuristic mix, where stories are being created with soundscapes and tapestries, and segues work as introductions to each story. I wanted to create bridges through different rhythms, so I worked with my brother Jose, as well as other percussionists and musicians in the studio, to create parts that flow between. I mixed it live with four CD players, effects, and reel-to-reel, then took it into the studio and tightened up some of the levels through editing. I wanted to mix it live so you get more of a human feel from it, to stay true to the texture of this music. And I really wanted it to reflect on the process of working on this whole project. Looking back, I’m honored and grateful to get to work on such historical music – and music I grew up with.” Never has the past sounded so present. The second disc features nine classic Fania tunes from Lou Perez, Celia Cruz, Eddie Palmieri, Ray Barretto and more all re-worked with the Joe Claussell touch.

“Mambo Mongo (Joaquin Joe Claussell Remix)” – Mongo Santamaria (FREE DOWNLOAD – HERE)

 

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About Fania

Today Fania is home to more than 200 of the top artists’ catalogs in Tropical music. These artists mixed a cornucopia of styles that transcended the boundaries of traditional Latin music and set the path for the genres of Latin Big Band, Afro-Cuban Jazz, Boogaloo, Salsa and Latin R&B. They include Beny Moré, Sonora Matancera, Orquesta Aragón, Celia Cruz, La Lupe, Tito Rodrguez, Ray Barretto, Cortijo, Hector Lavoe, Willie Colon, Johnny Pacheco, Joe Cuba, Larry Harlow and Ruben Blades to mention a few. The more than 4,000 albums from the 1940s through the 1980s have been carefully documented, archived and placed in a special media storage facility for original recorded media. In addition, Fania has been remastering and reissuing these treasures in digital format, original remastered cds, box sets and vinyl. For more information please visit www.fania.com.

DEM BOW giant REGGAETON BEAT MIXX!

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Yes, i’m slow, I know homie. but it just bumped into this really great mix by WAYNE of the awesome WAYNE n WAX, posted on another very cool blog, RIDDIM METHOD, I’m just knicking the entire thing, because its a great read AND a awesome mix! take it WAYNE:

to accompany my piece on reggaeton (with sidebar!) in this week’s phoenix, i’ve put together a mix intended to demonstrate just how deep the dem bow runs through contemporary reggaeton (as well as to establish some sonic links to jamaican dancehall and to other styles).

the sonic-social-symbolic connections here are multiple, myriad. though one can try and try to convey them in prose, sometimes hearing them is really the best way. and that’s what the riddim method’s all about (for me anyhow): letting the music do the talking.

so let’s get to the sounds in question, but permit me just a couple of notes to orient your attention to what you’ll be hearing.

wayne&wax, “dem bow mix” [mp3] (40 min / 48 mb)

it almost makes no sense to make a “dem bow mix” of reggaeton songs since the vast majority of reggaeton songs appear to feature some element of the inspiring, originary riddim. (and i’m not exagerrating when i say the vast majority.) thus, to make a reggaeton mix is to make a dem bow mix, and vice versa. that’s how inextricable the two are. the dem bow is reggaeton’s rhythmic DNA, a constant feature of the genre’s rhythmtexturtimbre, performing a function somewhere between ‘amen’ and clave. rather than boiling the blood of copyrighters, such use should prove a demonstration of the degree to which a vast world of derivative works can emerge from the creative sampling of recorded music, but which would not be possible – or conceivable even – without an utter disregard for, disrespect for, and disagreement with (american “international”) copyright law.

in the mix i’ve posted here, you’ll hear many appearances of dem bow, including more subtle, textural uses of the percussive loop as well as riddims that really foreground it. moreover, just for good measure, i often add an additional layer of the dem bow (in various versions) to thread pieces together, though a close examination will reveal the riddim already lurking in most of the tracks i’ve selected here. finally, as might be expected, i’ve also cooked up a couple specials and some little segments that i hope prove interesting.

i begin with the dem bow riddim itself (an “original” instrumental version, technically, as one would find on any one of a number of reggaeton “beats” CDs), overlayed with some clips from the BBC/”the world” radio program which aired last summer and featured some interview clips and beatboxing boom-chicking from yours truly. i like the way the mainstream media “hype” comes across here, complete with mis-pronunciations (”reggae-tawn”) and slight exaggeration. from there, we move into shabba ranks’s “dem bow,” the hit which propelled the dem bow riddim to NY, PR, and beyond. i don’t really want to get into the implications here of an entire genre essentially emerging from something that draws such stark lines in the sand, but suffice it to say that shabba’s thematic focus on “dem bow” is consistent with a lot of reggae (and some reggaeton): it’s anti-gay, anti-oral-sex, anti-imperialist.

the latter point – shabba’s pro-black stance against colonial(ist) oppression – points us to an interesting, and often overlooked, irony: that the dem bow is closely related to another dancehall riddim, the poco man jam, created by steelie&clevie in 1990, essentially “re-licked” (and tweaked) by bobby digital for shabba’s “dem bow,” and associated with and juggled alongside each other ever since. of course, “poco” in this case refers to the afro-jamaican religion, pocomania (alt. pukkumina), but i can’t help hearing a strong resonance with another meaning of poco. reggaeton’s relationship to race is something that has gone pretty unexamined in all of this coverage, so that’s another dimension – linked as it is to circumstances in the post-colonial americas – which i attempted to address, if only briefly, in my article for the phoenix.

after the dem bow/poco man section (including tunes by gregory peck, cutty ranks, and super cat), we hear panamanian founding-figure el general performing “son bow,” his traduccion of shabba’s “dem bow,” and from there, we get into the real deal: some PR-reppin’ from tony touch to kick it off, followed by some early, ruff-n-ready sounds from ivy queen. once we get into the reggaeton songs, we essentially thread our way through various “big chunes” that employ the dem bow, making a couple detours as we go: we hear how reggaeton producers nod to contemporary hip-hop as we segue from “el tiburon” to the busta rhymes song that seemingly inspired its chord-progression (as well as a dubplate-version by kingston-based DJ scrum dilly); there’s a section devoted to “juggling” over what we might think of as the gasolina riddim (for luny tunes appear to approach their riddims much like, say, lenky approached the diwali and steelie&clevie approached the poco man); and finally we close with two mini-mixes, the first devoted to bachataton or reggaetonchata or whatever they’re calling the increasingly common mixture of reggaeton and bachata (actually, i think they’re calling it reggaeton, and genres like bachata may be in serious danger of being eaten by reggaeton), the second devoted to some salsa-drenched remixes, including one of my own, connecting el gran combo’s “ojos chinos” to the tego song that alludes to it.

that – and the tracklist below – should be enough to give you a handle on all of this (si no ya lo tienes). ojala que hope you dig. if you do, go out and get yerself some reggaeton today. (i recommend these.)

wayne&wax, “dem bow mix” [mp3] (40 min / 48 mb)

tracklist:

Dem Bow intro: BBC “The World” excerpts
Shabba Ranks, “Dem Bow”
Gregory Peck, “Poco Man Jam”
Cutty Ranks, “Retreat”
Super Cat, “Nuff Man a Dead”
Shabba Ranks, “Dem Bow”
El General, “Son Bow”
Tony Touch, “Pa’ Que Tu Lo Sepa”
Ivy Queen, “Yo Soy La Queen”
Tony Touch ft. Nina Sky, “Play That Song”
Wisin & Yandel, “Rakata”
Alexis, Fido, & Baby Ranks, “El Tiburon”
Busta Rhymes, “Break Ya Neck” (w&w dembow mix)
Scrum Dilly, “Nah Go Stray (dubplate)” (w&w dembow mix)
Hector “El Bambino,” “Dale Castigo”
Daddy Yankee, “Dale Caliente”
Daddy Yankee, “Cojela Que Va Sin Jockey”
Ivy Queen, “Marroneo”
Daddy Yankee, “King Daddy”
Tony Touch ft. Lisa M, “Toca Me La”
Daddy Yankee, “Gasolina”
Don Omar ft. N.O.R.E., “Reggaeton Latino (remix)”
Don Omar, “Dile”
K Mill, “Metele Perro”
Ivy Queen, “La Mala”
Pitbull, Master Joe, & O.G. Black, “Mil Amores”
Ivy Queen, “Te He Querido, Te He Llorado”
Tego Calderon, “Metele Sazon”
Tego Calderon, “Dominicana”
El Gran Combo, “Ojos Chinos” (w&w dembow mix)
Daddy Yankee, “Sabor A Melao”
Dem Bow outro (Shabba Ranks vs. El General)

pocoman nuh bow. dem jam, seen tu sabes?

TALENTO DE BARRIO…

front-coverDADDY YANKEE has been on my, and well… everybody’s radar for some time, I love his older reggaeton stuff, don’t like the new hiphop stuff, but damn, the guy drops this cut on his same title album and it’s just pure fire. The rest of this album… I dont know man, it sounds a bit like the ‘western’ influences take over and he loses his strenght. back to the minimal, cold reggaeton beats for you DADDY! 🙂

DADDY YANKEE – TALENTO DE BARRIO

CLASSIC MASTERPIECE OF SALSA MUSIC!

sonidobestialCheck out this cut by RICARDO RAY & BOBBY CRUZ. What a nice lush 70’s latin sound, drenched in reverb…

Ricardo Ray & Bobby Cruz – Volver

“In 1971, they released “El Bestial Sonido de Ricardo Ray y Bobby Cruz”, the first ever release on Vaya Records, and was one of their better albums on that label. The album went gold, and it took them to the top of the charts once again. It included hits such as Joan Manuel Serrat‘s “Señora”, the bolero version of the Gardel/Lepera tango “Volver”, and the Rubén Blades composition “Guaguancó Triste”, as well as the salsa version of James Taylor‘s “Fire And Rain”. This album also included his most impressive and well-known hit called “Sonido Bestial”, which has a latin flavoured arrangement of Chopin‘s Etude 10/12, and is considered a classic masterpiece of salsa music…”

Ricardo Ray & Bobby Cruz – Sonido Bestial

SALSA de PUERTO RICO!

ng2I’m not big on ‘old school salsa’ right now, I fall in and out of love with the traditional stuff. But this is such a happy, joyful song that I just had to re-post it! The chorus is an instant ray of sunshine and in the grey, rainy country i’m in, I can use some right now! These cats are called Nueva Generación. Here ya go, grab a cocktail and some sunblock!

NG2 – ELLE MENEA